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He (Jesus) walked like us and worked like us. In a word, in order to insert himself better among us, He became like us; and, since resemblance develops love. He willed to appear and to act like us in order to be loved. He willed to take on our nature in order that we might be united to Him. He became man to show by His way of life how we should live. Vincent de Paul

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Oct 182014
 
Twenty-Ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time (José Antonio Pagola)

The poor are God’s Behind Jesus’ back, the Pharisees reach an agreement to prepare a decisive trap for him.  They do not come themselves to meet him.  They send some of their disciples, along with some supporters of Herod Antipas.  Perhaps not missing in that group are some powerful collectors of taxes for Rome. The trap is well thought out: “Is it lawful to pay census tax to Caesar or not?”  If he answers negatively, they will be able to accuse him of rebellion against [...] → [Read the full text]

Oct 182014
 
Twenty-Ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time (Rosalino Reyes Dizon)

Not in word alone, but also in power and in the Holy Spirit (1 Thes 1, 5) God speaks to us. But do we really understand him? Who guarantees us the truth? He speaks to us definitively and unambiguously through his Son, even though we, while hearing the same word, do not always understand it in the same way. Different stances give rise to different interpretations, for instance, of “Repay to Caesar what belongs to Caesar and to God what belongs to God.” Some cite [...] → [Read the full text]

Oct 112014
 
Twenty-Eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time (José Antonio Pagola)

Invitation Jesus knew very well how the rural folks of Galilee enjoyed themselves at the weddings that were celebrated in the villages.  Without a doubt, he himself took part in more than one.  What experience could have been more joyful for those people than to be invited to a wedding and to be able to sit down with their neighbors to share a wedding feast together? This remembrance from Jesus’ childhood helped him at some point to communicate his experience of God in a new [...] → [Read the full text]

Oct 112014
 
Twenty-Eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time (Rosalino Reyes Dizon)

God will fully supply whatever you need (Phil 4, 19) God invites us to a sumptuous banquet. Do we accept the invitation with respectful gratitude? The banquet is an image of the heavenly kingdom that Jesus ushers in and to which he calls us solely by his grace and without partiality. Many prophets and righteous people longed, during their lifetime, to hear the call and see the inauguration of the kingdom, but what they longed for was not granted them. So, blessed are we, for [...] → [Read the full text]

Oct 042014
 
Twenty-Seventh Sunday in Ordinary Time (José Antonio Pagola)

Religious crisis The parable of the “murderous tenants” is a story in which Jesus reveals allegorically step by step God’s history with his chosen people.  It is a sad story.  God has taken care of them from the beginning with all tenderness.  They were his “chosen vineyard.”  He expected them to be a people exemplary for their justice and faithfulness.  They would be a “great light” for all nations. Yet that people kept rejecting and killing one after another the prophets that God kept sending [...] → [Read the full text]

Oct 042014
 
Twenty-Seventh in Ordinary Time (Rosalino Reyes Dizon)

Keep on doing what you have learned (Phil 4, 9) The vineyard of the Lord is his people. He looks for choice and abundant harvest in them. God has chosen us so we may bear lasting fruit. He does everything to help us be all that we can be, sending us even his only Son so that we may believe in him and have life. The Lord takes care of us as a dedicated landowner takes care of his vineyard. He invests much in us. [...] → [Read the full text]

Sep 272014
 
Twenty-Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time (José Antonio Pagola)

Ahead of us One day Jesus uttered these harsh words against the religious leaders of his people: “Amen, I say to you, tax collectors and prostitutes are entering the kingdom of God before you.”  A few years ago I was able to verify that Jesus’ statement is not an exaggeration. A group of prostitutes from different countries, accompanied by some Oblate Sisters, reflected on Jesus with the help of the book, Jesus: An Historical Approximation.  I am still touched by the power and the attraction [...] → [Read the full text]